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Screaming for streaming: How to save your budget when all everyone wants is streaming
Recorded Oct. 22, 2020

 

Sponsored by The Representation Project

Producer: Gisele Tanasse

The demand for streaming video among instructors and patrons has skyrocketed in the last few years, with patrons largely unaware of the costs of licensing streaming content. Both faculty and students are less likely to agree to make use of collections of physical media like DVDs, and some classrooms on college and university campuses today no longer include DVD players. How do we prioritize and restrict streaming purchases, while continuing to respond to purchase requests and providing support to instructors who need access to films used in teaching? How do we educate students and instructors about the difference in costs between digital streaming licenses and one-time purchases of media for our physical collections?

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Part One: Acquisitions

Total program length: 50 minutes

Ever wanted to know how film distributors work? Inside each company is a fascinating decision-machine that calculates the revenue of every potential acquisition and designs a unique marketing strategy to maximize its potential. How do distributors know which films will be hits, and how does the educational and library market figure into their plans? Join us for a revealing discussion that’ll increase your knowledge of the economics of film.

Panelists:
Elizabeth Sheldon (Juno Films)
Will Whalen (ProQuest)


Total program length: 60 minutes

America’s colleges and universities are recovering from a nationwide disruption, and librarians who manage media have been at the center of the turmoil. It’s been too much to cover in one or two sessions — budgeting, streaming rights, reopening logistics, and more. Join us for part three of an open and free-wheeling discussion to share productive and practical solutions.

Panelists:
Uri Kolodney, University of Texas Austin
Amanda Riegel, Muhlenberg College


Total program length: 81 minutes

Teachers have long used video for teaching, but as classrooms move online, librarians must identify streaming video content to replace DVDs. This webinar will cover the basics of finding streaming video to match DVDs used; often a one-for-one replacement can be identified, usually at a significant additional cost. The presenters will cover the most frequently used educational streaming platforms and what makes each unique. They will also provide valuable information on finding open or free alternatives that may be used instead of or in addition to licensed content. The webinar is mainly directed at librarians who have taken the sudden plunge into streaming and need a basic “how to” guide. This is a repeat of our very popular session originally held on June 11. It will be recorded and available for replay on our archive page.

 

Sponsored by New Day Films, Program length one hour.

Description: When the coronavirus pandemic hit the US, colleges and universities across the nation went virtual — many with little or no preparation for the extent of this change. Library personnel played a critical role in responding. Building from our April 23 Live Community Event, this webinar will offer academic library participants an opportunity to listen and share their experiences relating to uses of streaming and video technology.

What worked and what didn’t? What can our libraries do better? What did we learn that we can use again?

The information you gain may help inform your library’s operations for months and possibly years to come, even after the pandemic has become history. For access to more resources, download the session chat file.



Description: Academic Libraries Video Trust is a long-running project of Video Trust. It’s a cooperative online repository of digitized content from VHS sources that are no longer available through distribution channels. This video for the Oberlin consortium explains what ALVT is, how it works, and how to join. Applicable for any consortium considering membership. Further questions can be directed to execdirector@videotrust.org. Also, please visit our ALVT page here and our ALVT website.


Description: When the coronavirus pandemic hit the US, public libraries across the nation closed, and some went virtual — most for the first time and with little or no preparation. Library personnel in all sizes of public libraries and library systems played a critical role in responding. Building from our April 23 Live Community Event, this webinar will offer public library participants an opportunity to listen and share their experiences relating to uses of streaming and video technology.

What worked and what didn’t? How can public libraries do better? What did we learn that we can use again?

Video Trust will seat a panel of librarians to kick off the discussion, and individual attendees are invited to join LIVE at this important community event. The information you gain may help inform your library’s operations for months and possibly years to come, even after the pandemic has become history.

Video Trust is a nonprofit organization that provides professional development and film resources for K-12, public, and academic librarians. Learn more and sign up for our monthly newsletter at videotrust.org.

Panelists:
Elena Snooki-Ross (New York Public Library)
Janet Makoujy (New City Public Library)



Description: When the coronavirus pandemic hit the US, K-12 classrooms across the nation went virtual — most for the first time and with little or no preparation. Library personnel at the school, district, and state levels played a critical role in responding. Building from our April 23 Live Community Event, this webinar will offer K-12 library participants an opportunity to listen and share their experiences relating to uses of streaming and video technology.

What worked and what didn’t?

What can school libraries do better?

What did we learn that we can use again?

Video Trust will seat a panel of librarians to kick off the discussion, and individual attendees are invited to join LIVE at this important community event. The information you gain may help inform your library’s operations for months and possibly years to come, even after the pandemic has become history.

Panelists:
Jim Wilson (Canyons District, Utah)
Erin Berry (Caddo Parrish Public Schools, Louisiana)


SPONSORED BY GKIDS, PROGRAM LENGTH: 1 HOUR

Description: If there’s one thing the library community has learned in 2020, it’s that something like a pandemic creates a greater need for remote communications. Classrooms across the nation went virtual and streaming video has been a key element in making that happen. Media librarians and their vendor colleagues played a critical role in the response. Our upcoming webinar will provide a brief respite so that we as a community can share experiences and reactions to the pandemic.

  • What worked and what didn’t?

  • What can libraries do better?

  • What did we learn that we can use again?

Video Trust will seat a panel of librarians and vendors to kick off the discussion, and individual attendees are invited to join LIVE at this important community event. The information you gain may help inform your library’s operations for months and possibly years to come, even after the pandemic has become history.

Panelists:

Gisele Tanasse (UC Berkeley)
Jim Davis (Docuseek)
Erin Berry (Caddo Parish Public Schools)
Douglas Meloche (St. Louis Public Library)
David Parker (ProQuest)
Janet Makoujy (New City Library)
Kevin Sayar (Kanopy)

Leaders:
Erin DeWitt-Miller (UNT)
Charles Cobine (UPenn)

DOWNLOAD CHAT FILE (TXT)



SPONSORED BY Third World Newsreel and Video Project

Digitizing video, whether from proprietary content or that which qualifies for Section 108 exemptions, can involve a number of tasks that collectively make for a complicated and perhaps confusing workflow. Our experienced panel involves those who have digitized hundreds of titles and those who’ve barely begun, coming together to ask and answer questions, trade tips, and establish best practices. Panelists will include Phil Salvador (American University), Tom Nemeth (William Paterson University), David Rodriguez (Florida State University), Erin Dewitt-Miller (U of North Texas), and Charles Cobine (U of Pennsylvania). (1 hour length)

Links to Market Mania Online Reels:
Third World Newsreel
Video Project

Links to slides:
Phil Salvador (American University)
Tom Nemeth (Wm. Patterson University)
David Rodriguez (Florida State University)


SPONSORED BY: New Day Films and Passion River Films

From access to preservation, librarians across the country have been perplexed by demand for content that’s available only through consumer streaming. Copyright law permits libraries to do what they have always done with physical collections under the first sale doctrine: lend and provide access.

The first sale doctrine, codified in Section 109 of the Copyright Act, provides that anyone who legally acquires a copyrighted work receives the right to sell, display, or otherwise dispose of that particular copy. This is how libraries loan books.

Fair use ultimately asks, “whether the copyright law’s goal of promoting the Progress of Science and useful Arts would be better served by allowing the use than by preventing it.” (Bill Graham Archives v. Dorling Kindersley Ltd., 448 F.3d 605, 608 (2d Cir. 2006)).

Libraries maintain the market balance long-recognized by the courts and Congress as between rights holders and libraries, making it possible for libraries to fulfill their “vital function in society” by enabling the lending and access to materials to benefit the general learning, research, and intellectual enrichment of readers.

The US Supreme Court has even labeled downstream licensing as “obnoxious to the public interest.” (243 U.S. 490 (1917), 501).

How can libraries uphold missions to acquire, make accessible, and preserve content when that important content is not available for sale? Panelists will review the current state of consumer-licensed content, and offer suggestions for action and remedies.

See/Download slide deck for this session

Panelists:

  • Carrie Russell, Director, Public Policy and Advocacy at the American Library Association

  • Will Cross, Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University

  • Sarah McCleskey, Head of Resource and Collection Services at Hofstra University Library

INCLUDES 2 MARKET MANIA ONLINE PRESENTATIONS! (To watch Market Mania Online Segments separately, click the links below.)

PASSION RIVER MARKET MANIA REEL


 

 SPONSORED BY: Collective Eye Films

The effect of PDA on budgets and collection development has been a nonstop topic of conversation for years. Let’s hear vendors talk about PDA and how it can be — and is being — improved for all the libraries who might be wondering about the future of this revolution in access.

Panelists:

  • Will Whalen (ProQuest/Alexander Street)

  • James-Michael Boyer (Collective Eye Films)

  • Chris Dappen (Kanopy)

INCLUDES 2 MARKET MANIA ONLINE PRESENTATIONS! (To watch Market Mania Online Segments separately, click the links below.)

COLLECTIVE EYE FILMS MARKET MANIA REEL

BULLFROG FILMS MARKET MANIA REEL


The Advocate for Libraries & Film